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Thread: Selecting the right suspension

  1. v413nc3 Guest

    Sorry I've been in the springs so I wasn't checking the board...


    Camber: You have 2 types of camber, which is basically the angle at which the TOP of your tire is at. NEGATIVE camber which is where the top is angled in towards the engine compartment, and POSITIVE where it is angled away.

    Negative camber helps with correct understeer and will aid in agressive handling. This is because when you go to steer the inside wheel is already going to "plow" towards the corner.

    Positive camber adds to understeer and aids in straight line handling.

    I don't know where you figure "race" cars don't have negative camber, I usually run a good deal of negative to help with cornering.

    Strut bars I would say are extremely effective in preventing body roll when used in CONJUNCTION with a good swaybar setup. Art makes a good point in the fact that if you stiffen the front and don't do much with the rear you're gonna have exaggerated your understeer problem. I would get a much larger rear sway, such as a good one from RMDSM and a rear strut. This should help center out your suspension.

    As far as your setup. It looks to be a good street setup and with minor adjustments can be a good beginer/mild setup for roadracing. You definately need to take care of your rear suspension if you plan to AutoX though. Because your shocks have limited tuning capabilities it's hard to really give recomendations on your setup. If you would like to speak more on the subject though I would be glad to give suggestions.

  2. OneSlowEclipse Guest

    Well first of all, forgive the newbie questions. I am fairly new to suspension mods, or functional suspension mods anyway. There are very few people really into suspension on 2gnt that are willing to talk and answer stupid questions.

    "I would get a much larger rear sway, such as a good one from RMDSM"

    So what is considered large? The RMDSM upgrade for the FWD cars is actually smaller than the suspension techniques bar I got which is 3/4". The only larger I have seen is the GSX RMDSM bar and that is one .81" or something.

    I had planned on getting a rear strut bar, I just haven't found a functional one that I liked yet. I don't understand how leaving the rear a bit loose can exagerate understeer though. If the rear was a bit loose, wouldn't it start to loose traction quicker? Or are you saying the weight of the rear leaning will pull the front end?

  3. v413nc3 Guest

    I keep forgetting you're not AWD. You won't get better oversteer with a stiffer rear. For a good rear strut I would use RoadRace Engineerings rear strut brace, very good strut bar. As far as sway bars go... always buy the ones for the AWD, they bolt right up and will give you a much stiffer suspension I don't mind answering newbie questions, it's the whole reason I wrote this.

  4. GimPin Guest

    Originally posted by OneSlowEclipse
    Dang... you musta been typing that all night!!

    You didn't talk about camber at all from what I can see. This is something that I have always wondered about, because you never see race cars with much negative camber, yet I have always heard that negative camber is better for handling. Maybe you could shed some light on this for me? (im trying to decide if I need to get camber kits or not...)
    next time there is nothing on TV to watch flip to speed channel and watch the Indy or CART cars and get a good view of their front wheels ..... There MASIVE negative camber .... circle track guys usualy have masive negative camber on their outside wheels

  5. GimPin Guest

    oh yeah and thanks for all the info... its been very helpful

  6. v413nc3 Guest

    Glad to be of help. I think I'll write a second one and put all these in the review area so you guys have a place to refer to for info. I think I'll call it Suspension 202

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    just to give you guys an idea i am running -3 degrees front and -2 degrees rear camber. this is pretty close to the sweet spot for how i drive the car. if the car feels alittle off in the turns, then i adjust the tire pressure to make up for it.


    theres thousands of ways to make a car handle better. you just need to know what you want to do with it.
    '95 Mitsu GSX
    '06 Nissan Titan SE

  8. v413nc3 Guest

    Dave!! Make this a sticky

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    done
    '95 Mitsu GSX
    '06 Nissan Titan SE

  10. Strut tower observations

    So this is my first post to the site. I owned a 1G for a while and am contemplating another one right now. However, I saw this "suspension" post and one peice was confusing to me - the strut tower.
    Hang on for the long post

    Ok, I have some questions about the strut tower brace. You state with regard to the strut tower brace that you “should actually attempt to push them as far away from each other as possible.” This does not make sense to me. Let’s look at a couple of things.

    First of all, physics. An object in motion tends to stay in motion unless acted upon by an outside force. So you car is ripping down the road at a significant pace. You initiate a turn by adjusting the steering input. The contact patch of the tire then loads and starts forcing the vehicle in a new direction – however, the vehicle wants to go straight. So the tire flexes: the lower portion pulls in while the top of the tire pushes out. Basically the top still tries to go straight while the contact patch forces it to turn. The same is true for everything above the contact patch – it all keeps trying to go straight. This would seem to be true for the strut tower as well. Which means that the top of the tower pushes out just like the top of the tire and would thus need to “pull” on the other brace to remain rigid.

    Ok, another view, leverage. The tire (and ultimately the contact patch) is connected to a wheel. The wheel is connected to a spindle and rides on a bearing. This is the only place that contact is made between the car and the rim – the bearing on the spindle! So, all of the force on the bearing is placed there by the contact patch of the tire. When turning (regarding the outside tire), all of the force on the outside wheel is being forced in on the lower part of the bearing while unloading (not loading as much or to a lesser degree) the top of the bearing. Since this acts as a lever to the spindle (pushing in on the bottom and pulling out on the top, or pushing up on the inside of the spindle while pulling down on the outside) and to the rest of the suspension components, the force of pushing in on the lower part of the bearing must be resisted by other parts of the car/suspension. Therefore, the force pushing in on the bottom pulls all pieces above it OUT. Thus the loaded strut tower is pulled away from the other less loaded tower.

    Basically, the tower tries to separate when cornering and thus should be forced to pull on the other tower. So to pull on the other tower, you would need the brace to be a short as possible, not long. It would seem to me that you would want the brace to “pull as close as possible” rather than pushing apart.

    Does this make sense to anyone else?

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